Is Your Horse Equine Professional Friendly?

by Lisa Carter on July 25, 2015

5 Things Every Horse Should Know - https://www.heavenlygaitsequinemassage.com

Is your horse equine professional friendly?  This may seem like a silly question, but I think you'd be surprised at the number of horses I've encountered over the years (my own included) that are not.  Many of you will think much of this is just common sense.  But I think for the majority of caretakers, it's just not something that they've actually tested to see if their horses have an issue.  They just assume that their horses will be okay. 

I'd like to share with you 5 things that your horse should know which will make your horse not only safer for you to be around, but help make your equine professionals' jobs much easier to accomplish.  So whether your horse needs the help of a veterinarian, farrier, bodyworker, etc., if you practice these basic things on a regular basis, you'll have a lot of bases covered. 

5 Things Every Horse Should Know

  • Give To Pressure At The Poll
  • Stand Tied Patiently For Extended Periods
  • Basic Handling For Shots/Temperature
  • Being Able To Work Around Inner Thigh/Sheath/Teats
  • Being Able To Handle/Maneuver Limbs

The information in this article is not meant to diagnose, treat or cure any condition or illness.  Nor is it meant replace proper veterinary care. It is meant for educational purposes only.  Always consult your chosen veterinary professional before starting your horse or other animal on any therapy. 


Lisa Carter, Certified Equine Massage Therapist, with her Arabian mare Siofhice.  www.heavenlygaitsequinemassage.com.Lisa Carter is a Certified Equine Massage Therapist (CEMT), with multiple certifications from several different equine bodywork schools.  She incorporates her knowledge and experience with Parelli Natural Horsemanship, equine bodywork, using essential oils for animals and as a veterinary technician to provide her clients with the resources they need to make informed decisions for their horses.  She encourages and facilitates network building between equine health care professionals, working together to find the best combination of therapies to meet the needs of the "whole horse".  

Are you ready to get better results with your horse?  Put your equine health care team to work so you and your horse can be doing what you were meant to.  Click here to get started!

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